“Another Test of Patience”

Today has definitely been a doozy, a trying test on my patience.  My daughter’s attitude today, in school, proved that she’s not interested in what a general education has to offer.  I haven’t been able to get her to take school seriously, and I’m struggling to figure out what else I can do, to shine some light on the subject.

I’ve tried relating to her, but do you know where that gets me?  I get the ‘you’re so lame’ attitude.  I’ve tried telling her about my experiences, but she only rolls her eyes at me.  Why do kids have a hard time believing we were ever their age?  I say “When I was your age…” and she’s all *annoyed sigh/full eye-roll combo*.  Yeah, you know what I’m talking about.  You get it to?  I’ve even tried using her role-models and favorite actors and actresses for examples, but on one hand she doesn’t want to or can’t see passed who they play as characters, and on the other hand, it’s like she believes they were handed that life.  Like their life is automatic or something.

Well, after sitting through two different classes with her where I was in the room, but not necessarily right next to her, she didn’t do so well on a couple of tests.  I told her to write down the questions and the answers on paper, but as usual she didn’t because she hates doing it.  It takes too much time, or more often “I forgot” is always her go to excuse.  I sat next to her during her third class connect.  The funny thing is she took notes and she wrote down the questions to her test and the answers, and she passed on the first try.  (Hmm.  Imagine that, mom was right.)

It’s amazing how much mothers sacrifice for their children, but that’s part of parenthood.  It’s also knowing when to be your child’s friend and when to be their parent.  For the most part, I’m Special Education provider/mother, and her friend, ONLY when she’s acting like a normal, fun-loving teenager I want her to be.  I love watching her dance around her room to music by Dove Cameron, China Anne McClain, Sofia Carson, and Sabrina Carpenter.  I love when I check in on her and she’s making something out of scrap fabric, or when she’s making jewelry like ‘Dizzy’ does in “Descendants 2”.  I also love when she’s really trying in school–writing notes and taking screenshots using her tablet, writing down her test questions as told, and of course, when she’s getting decent to good grades.  I’m not choosy.  I’ll accept ‘C’s’ because ‘C’s’ are showing an effort.

The funny thing about motherhood is that we wouldn’t trade it for the world!

“Work From Home VS Work-From-Home”

I hate Mondays, but I can’t say I hate Mondays because in reality, I don’t hate any day, I just hate the things that can occur during the day.

For instance, through the week, my daughter is in school.  I’m there as well, listening in, keeping my daughter focused on school.  Sometimes the day goes smooth.  She doesn’t act out or act up, she doesn’t run her mouth but listens and does as instructed.  Sometimes she has a really good day.  Other days, like today (which is coincidentally Monday) she doesn’t want to do anything school related.  On days like today, her attitude gets the best of her and she doesn’t want to do any more than sit and listen.  Today she had a quiz to complete in English class, the teacher also instructed her students to locate a tune for tomorrow’s ‘Tune Tuesday’ and create a slide for the song of choice, then submit it to her.  Well, my daughter was all over locating a song, specifically looking up “Ins and Outs” by Sofia Carson, for her presentation slide.  With me supervising, she found the song, used her tablet to take a screenshot of the lyrics, and she was ready to transfer it to paper.  She grabbed a clean sheet of paper, a gel pen, and she went right to copying it out.  Later when it was time to take a quiz also assigned for English, I told her to get her paper and a pen, and get to work.  The quizzes in  school allow for unlimited attempts (except for math–I don’t know why).  She took the quiz five times she said, got an “F”, and she was going to give up.  When I checked in on her work, I didn’t see the quiz questions on paper.  When I asked her where they were, she told me in her quietly timid voice, I didn’t write them down, or I didn’t do it.  Do you see the problem here?  She has no problem copying down the lyrics to her favorite song, but school work is another story. (Sigh)

So, here I am.  I’m finally able to do my work.  I wanted to write this, and I have a story I’m working on rewriting for my manuscript (or work-in-progress).

Working from home is hard; it’s just like having any other kind of job.  I’ve worked retail, ringing up customers for 8-10 hours a day, putting out stock, unloading delivery trucks, and I’ve had other jobs.  I waitress-ed for a small cafe, and I’ve worked as a cook in a couple restaurants.  One of them went out of business, but that had nothing to do with me.  It was a financial problem on the owners end.  Working from home is just like any of that–just cut out the commute–but there is still the stress, time, and effort applied.

Working-from-home doesn’t just mean I can do my work from home, it means I work from home.  I’m a mom, a Learning Coach in School, a writer and blogger, a wife, and a caregiver.