Home Sweet Motorhome

Hey y’all!  So, the last time I posted, it was a piece my husband wrote about scammers on Facebook Marketplace falsely advertising top-notch motorhomes and RV’s for ridiculously low pricing. 

Today, I’m writing because we finally made it happen.  Yes, we bought our motorhome!

This week has been so anxiety driven and action packed, I’m simply glad we were able to accomplish the enormous task. 

Hubby and I have been scouring Facebook Marketplace for what feels like months.  I swear to y’all, I was checking the site 5, 6, 7 times a day just to see if anything new had been added, and I was rechecking motorhomes and RV’s which we’d already read over deciding not to inquire.  Well, last week, hubby found this one, a 24ft with 2 sleeping areas. 

So, through the weekend I enquired with the seller, first making sure it was still available, exchanging numbers for better communication, and finally, arranging it so that we had a ride to go and look at the motorhome. 

On Monday, my dad and his wife agreed to take my husband, daughter, and myself to go and look at it; just under an hour to get there, and the same to get back.  The motorhome looked just as it did in its pictures, the interior is needing some work, but no more than we can handle, and my husband started it up.  It cranked over like a beast on the first try. 

On Tuesday, the guy selling it was nice enough to help us out a little further, and personally drove the motorhome to us though Hurricane Ida was making her way through.  I was browning some ground beef to make chili when I happened to look out our kitchen windows and saw our motorhome drive by on the next road over from ours. 

The only detail I don’t like about the motorhome interior is its carpet.  I hate carpet.  I hate carpet.  Did I mention, I hate carpet?

On Wednesday, after I finished with my scheduled classes for the morning, my husband and I tackled face first into the next project… ripping the carpet out.  We spent that afternoon and Thursday afternoon ripping carpet out and removing the trash accumulated and left behind by previous owners. 

Sorry, it’s not the best, clearest photo of the carpet before I tore it up, but you get the idea that it had to go.

On Friday, I admit I didn’t do anything with our motorhome.  Instead, I taught 3 scheduled classes, took a nice long nap, and then proceeded to do very little through the rest of the day.  Everyone needs a day off from working and I was more than exhausted. 

Same general area as previous photo, but after I ripped the carpeting out. We’re going to put down water resistant wood laminate.

I’m hopeful that next week we’ll be able to get it properly tagged and titled as well as install new flooring in it.  Once the new flooring is in, I can properly scrub everything inside, from top to bottom, then proceed with the details of minimizing our belongings.  We’re not hoarders, but we do have a lot of things, most of it being in the media department.

I said we had a lot of books.

So, everything has been a process, but we’re getting there… one day at a time.  I know it’ll all be worth it once we’re moved in and settled. 

As always, thanks for reading y’all!

Troy Talks: Health Watch 1

My wife and I have been perusing the motorhomes available in our area on Facebook Marketplace. We wish to take our only child around this vast, panoramic country to provide her with some on-the-spot experiences before she has to take on the world by herself. We all know there are scam artists in this world, people who feel the only way for them to accomplish their own dreams is to step on someone else. Several of these people, for there are many out there, choose to prey on the unwary buyer on Facebook Marketplace.

Finding a 1995 Dolphin Motorhome for sale for two thousand dollars is not necessarily a scam. When it is in the condition of this one, it probably is.

After contacting the email, my wife talked with the woman selling it, a lady in the military, who said that she was away from home for medical, military training purposes. She told my wife over the phone (via email) that her son had died at eighteen in a bike accident, and she was selling the motorhome for two thousand dollars due to the sad feelings she felt toward the passing of her son. We only had to purchase four BestBuy cards and load each with five hundred dollars. Then, eBay would step in, protecting both the buyer and seller from fraud. The seller would then ship us the motorhome, which was in storage in California due to her being away for training. After the motorhome was delivered, eBay would release the money to her.

As my wife and I have been searching for the perfect motorhome for our family for a long time, we did not see the scam. I am sorry to say that we almost believed the woman’s sad story about her son. We didn’t have any knowledge of people scamming others in this fashion and it wasn’t until we went to purchase the BestBuy cards that a clerk mentioned it might be a scam. This got me thinking about the old adage- If it seems to good to be true, it probably is.

When we got home, my wife and I, each with our own laptops, dug into the information we already had, as well as look up the relationship with BestBuy cards and eBay, which the woman selling the motorhome assured us was involved. She even gave us a phone number to contact eBay. When I talked with the guy on the phone, who spoke with a thick accent, he assured me it was legal and the safest way to protect both the seller and the buyer. Yet, when I looked up the association of BestBuy cards to eBay, the number to eBay was different from the number the seller gave me, and eBay told me they didn’t have anything to do with purchasing vehicles on Facebook Marketplace through BestBuy cards.

Though my wife and I didn’t actually get taken for two thousand dollars this time, due to a friendly warning and some quick thinking on our part, there are many out there who do fall for this type of scam. Beware of something that might be too good to be true.

Another example of this scam, to provide a sense of comparison, is this 2003 Fleetwood Tioga. As you can see from the picture, it is far too nice to be sold for two thousand dollars.

Seller’s Description- I don’t answer at chat, please contact me by email: (emailaddress@gmail. com) 2003 Fleetwood Tioga 23E- Price $2000. The price is $2000. I always kept it in garage, no rust, no dents, original paint, no accidents and clean title without any liens or encumbrances. Excellent condition. It is non-smoker, non-pets in this car. It was just serviced 3 days ago, new tires, tags up to date, etc.

You can also see the message is eerily similar to the first. If you were to contact them, they would probably tell you a sad story about one of their family members passing away, which is why they are now selling such a magnificent camper for such a low price.

There is no way, unless this person is the kindest person in the world, that this class C camper is for sale for two thousand dollars. The first warning to these scams is the email address. It clearly states that you are not supposed to use email addresses, telephone numbers, or personal information. The second, when and if you do contact the seller, is the seller does not ‘answer to chat’. A third, which sometimes shows up at the bottom of the description, is this statement. “This seller has turned on vacation mode and is currently not accepting orders or receiving messages.” Remember to check out everything. Too many people fall for these simple scams and the world is not better for it. Be wary and be wise. Stay safe.